Hair Across the Moon



Reblogged from aonodreamland

asharah:

aonodreamland:

Suzuran aka Lily of The Valley

Lily of the Valley deck my garden walk…

Fave

Reblogged from nomorewaterthefirenexttime
  • The US Government: We're not going to make it federally mandatory for people to get paid a wage they can actually live off of
  • The US Government: If people want to make a living, they'll just have to work 16+ hours a day
  • The US Government: And if their kids end up disenfranchised because of a lack of parental involvement, well that's not our problem
  • The US Government: In fact, what is our problem is creating a system that will funnel these disenfranchised youth into our prison system so they can work for corporations (that promise us money) for damn near free
  • The US Government: If they don't want to fall victim to this system, then they can seek higher education
  • The US Government: Except such an education will be inaccessible to most disenfranchised people and skewed in favor of the financially stable and white people
  • The US Government: And we're not going to make intervention programs like sex education and conflict resolution federally mandatory, because that's the parent's job
  • The US Government: The parent who is working 16 hours a day
Reblogged from ala-con

alaskanlibrarian:

5 Things That People Don’t Realize their Librarians Do

wattsay:

This is a great article written by a public librarian. And I bet if you stopped people on the street and asked them to describe “librarian” the most popular answer would resemble a public librarian, the second most a school librarian, and I’m not sure if anyone would be thinking of us creatures known as “academic librarians.” (And all the other kinds of librarians? *I* love you, but very few people know that you exist. If they did, they’d know you’re AWESOME.)

Let me throw in my two cents about this list from the perspective of an academic librarian.

1. Librarians are teachers.

Yes, yes, and yes. I’ve taught retired employees how to use Facebook. I’ve taught PhD students how to start their dissertation research. I’ve taught high school students getting a 1-day field trip at a major research library. I’ve taught too many first year students to count. I’ve taught classes that were completely voluntary and ones that were compulsory. I’ve done the one-shot and the semester-long graded class.  And I’ve had to do all this without having ever taken a single education class in either undergraduate or graduate school.

2.Librarians are tech savvy.

I don’t teach classes on Word or Excel, but I can’t tell you how many times I’ve taught an individual how to do something on commonly used software. Just because a student was accepted at the University of Georgia doesn’t mean they know how to vary page number placement on their paper. Or attach a file to an email.

We HAVE to keep abreast of the latest technology. When you primarily work with 18-22 year-olds, you BETTER know what they’re using and how they’re using it. “How can I print wirelessly from my iPad?” “Does this sync with Evernote?” 

Behind the scenes, we do so much from a technical standpoint to streamline and ease access to our MANY, MANY electronic resources. We’re not dummies - we know you’re more interested in articles than books and you’re more interested in getting them online than coming into the building. We’re doing everything we can to make sure that works smoothly for you.

We’re also pretty f***ing brilliant at printers.

3. Librarians are advertisers.

And often with zero budget. We’re reading the trend pieces to find out what social media platforms 18-22 year-olds are tuned into. We only have so much time in the day and it doesn’t make sense to go where your patrons aren’t. That librarian over there? She’s taught herself Illustrator to make the majority of our graphics for posters/signs/fliers/etc. That library staff member over there? Learned how to make animated gifs in Photoshop so we could catch your eye that way. And most of us do this without having ever studied graphic design/public relations/advertising/etc. But since we’re librarians, we look up how to do it and we’re off to the races.

Whenever we hear too many students say, “I didn’t know you guys did/had/offered THAT,” you better believe we’re going to figure out ways to make sure your fellow students will know in the future. 

4. Librarians are event planners.

Again, often with zero budget. I’ve personally baked cookies in my own oven to bring to events. I’ve dreamt up prizes that required no cash outlay. 

Getting all the people and things together in one place for an event to take place is not a skill to be underestimated. It takes so much cooperation and organization, often from more than one department.

5.Librarians are researchers.

This is probably the most obvious one when you think of “academic librarians.” But it’s more than pointing out a encyclopedia. It’s teaching students the difference between primary and secondary sources. It’s teaching them how to evaluate sources, how to incorporate them into their own research. It’s about teaching them that YES, they can have an original thought and use someone else’s research and reasoning to back it up. It’s about teaching them when to use books, when to use articles, and how to use both of those. It’s introducing them to the wonderful world of things that aren’t “book” or “article.”

But, we don’t just help YOU do YOUR research, we are often doing research ourselves. (So are other librarians, but academic librarians are often “motivated” by publication requirements of tenure/promotion.) That research can vary so widely it’s unbelievable. Let’s research how the brain works when you’re doing research. Let’s research the differences in two medieval texts. Let’s research how people learn. Let’s research why books aren’t where they’re supposed to be on the shelf. (That’s mine!) Let’s research new ways of classifying things. Social Sciences? Humanities? Sciences? Librarians publish in all these fields. 

Good themes to highlight for national library week.

(Source: ala-con)

Reblogged from violenceandscience

cuttlefishbones:

athickgirlscloset:

violenceandscience:

Silver/white hair love

I want to be this cool when I’m older

working on it :)

I have always wanted gorgeous silver/white hair like this! Unfortunately my observation and experience has taught me it happens to black/dark haired people. And I’m a damn blonde. 

(via jadedcoconut)

Reblogged from sixpenceee

sixpenceee:

hey! I just thought that this was super powerful and sends out an important message.

full video

Well, this is accurate.

(via sebhar)

Reblogged from 0nechoice

jakedadoge:

0nechoice:

THANK YOU JENNI HERD

This has been ‘ya herd’ with jenni herd

Yes!

(via sariazbest)

Reblogged from sakkeh3arja

qamaranwzaytoun:

As the Syrian conflict’s three-year anniversary approaches, Amal Hanano, a Syrian activist based in the US, wanted to honor the memories of those killed. So the Aleppo-native started the 100,000 Names campaign. On March 14, Hanano will lead a 72-hour-long recitation on the White House lawn of 100,000 names of those killed in Syria. “We want the violence and bloodshed to end,” Hanano told BuzzFeed. “We want to go back to the roots of the revolution, which was freedom.” Hanano collected the names from the Violations Documentation Center in Syria, as well as Syrian activists and the British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. In the 15 days leading up to the anniversary, she has also been tweeting portraits, drawn by journalist Molly Crabapple, of Syrians killed in the conflict. Here are the faces, names, and stories of 15 fallen Syrian citizens.

image

Mohamed Hamouda, a 7-year-old-boy, died from regime sniper during a protest on Apr. 22, 2011.

image

Hamza Al-Khatib, 13, was tortured and killed on May 25, 2011 in Daraa after being detained for one month by Syrian security forces. Hamza’s image became an icon of the Syrian revolution.


image

Hakam Drak Sibai, 26, was a Red Crescent medic. He was killed in his hometown of Homs in Sept. 2011, when bullets struck his ambulance while he was treating wounded protesters.

image

Rami al-Sayed was a 26-year-old citizen journalist and father of a baby girl. He was killed in Baba Amr on Feb. 21, 2012 when his car was hit by a bomb.


image

Fatima Meghlaj, 2, was decapitated by a bomb that fell on her house in Idleb in Sept. 2012.

image

Tamer Al-Awam, 34, was a well-known filmmaker, poet, and writer from Sweida. He was shot and killed by regime forces in Aleppo on Sept. 9, 2012 while filming a documentary on the Free Syrian Army.

image

Yousef Alakraa, age unknown, was a media activist, poet, and artist. He was killed by Syrian government shelling in Homs on Sept. 26, 2012.

image

Rua Ismael, 11,  died from a terrorist bombing in the town of Salamiyeh on Jan. 25, 2013. After he death, Rua was nicknamed, “Syria’s Snow White” on Syrian social media.

image

Noura, 12, was killed by an air strike in the town of Kafranbel on Dec. 1, 2013.

image

Amina Othman was a second year literature student at the University of Aleppo. She was displaced three times during the conflict. Amina was killed in Aleppo in 2013, when her uncle’s home was shelled while she was inside.

Firas Al-Salem, age unknown, reportedly died from torture at a security center in Damascus run by the Assad regime. Firas, from the Yarmouk Camp in Damascus, was detained for a year before he died on March 1, 2014.image

Firas Al-Salem, age unknown, died under torture at a security center in Damascus run by the Assad regime. Firas, from the Yarmouk Camp in Damascus, was detained for a year before he died on March 1, 2014.

image

Batoul was 12 when she was killed in a car bombing in Kafat village on Jan. 9, 2014.

image

Wissam Sara, 27, was a peace activist, father of two, and son of political opposition leader, Fayez Sara. Wissam died under torture in the Syrian government’s Military Security Branch in Damascus in Feb. 2014.

image

Ghiath Matar, 25, was a peace activist, tailor, and father-to-be. He was killed in Daraya under torture, by Syrian security forces. Ghiath was famous for handing flowers and water bottles to regime forces at protests. His nickname was “Little Gandhi.”

image
Dr Mohamad Abyad, 28, was a orthopedic surgeon. He worked for Doctors Without Borders in Aleppo, until he was killed under torture by an extremist group.

(Source: sakkeh3arja, via aweeeli-deactivated20140409)

Reblogged from wtf-fun-factss
medievalpoc:

doublehamburgerjack:

frantzfandom:

deux-zero-deux:

wtf-fun-factss:

Traces of coca and nicotine found in Egyptian mummies - WTF fun facts

well DUH. a lot of historians are still trying to process the fact that ancient egyptians knew how to build boats, which is ridiculous. why would they not be seafarers and explorers?

this is not new or surprising information at all. it pretty much day one of any african-american studies course.
the egyptians knew that if they put their boats in front of the summer storm winds it’d blow them right across the sea to the Americas and they shared that with the greeks.

It’s really hard for people to understand that everyone had boats, exploration, and trade interactions without the same level of murder, colonization, and violence that the Europeans did. It’s really hard for people to get that.

An 11,000 year old Iroqious boat.
A whole book about Ancient Egyptian Maritime technology and culture.
Scientists “shocked” to discover that humanity casually traveled the seas over 100,000 years ago.
The Sea-Craft of Prehistory (book; Eurocentric as heck)
Humans traveling long distances by sea and deep=sea fishing for c. 42,000 years
The Dufuna Canoe, Africa’s oldest surviving boat, is 8,000 years old (Nigeria)
A fleet of 5,000-year-old boats in Abydos, Egypt
7,000-year-old seaworthy vessels in Kuwait
7,500-year-old boat found in China’s Zhejiang Province. 
Scientific Evidence for Pre-Columbian Transoceanic Voyages (273 pages-for the hardcore only!):

The only plausible explanation for these findings is that a considerable number of transoceanic voyages in both directions across both major oceans were completed between the 7th millennium BC and the European age of discovery. Our growing knowledge of early maritime technology and its accomplishments gives us confidence that vessels and nautical skills capable of these long-distance travels were developed by the times indicated. These voyages put a new complexion on the extensive Old World/New World cultural parallels that have long been controversial.



Neat!

medievalpoc:

doublehamburgerjack:

frantzfandom:

deux-zero-deux:

wtf-fun-factss:

Traces of coca and nicotine found in Egyptian mummies - WTF fun facts

well DUH. a lot of historians are still trying to process the fact that ancient egyptians knew how to build boats, which is ridiculous. why would they not be seafarers and explorers?

this is not new or surprising information at all. it pretty much day one of any african-american studies course.

the egyptians knew that if they put their boats in front of the summer storm winds it’d blow them right across the sea to the Americas and they shared that with the greeks.

It’s really hard for people to understand that everyone had boats, exploration, and trade interactions without the same level of murder, colonization, and violence that the Europeans did. It’s really hard for people to get that.

An 11,000 year old Iroqious boat.

A whole book about Ancient Egyptian Maritime technology and culture.

Scientists “shocked” to discover that humanity casually traveled the seas over 100,000 years ago.

The Sea-Craft of Prehistory (book; Eurocentric as heck)

Humans traveling long distances by sea and deep=sea fishing for c. 42,000 years

The Dufuna Canoe, Africa’s oldest surviving boat, is 8,000 years old (Nigeria)

A fleet of 5,000-year-old boats in Abydos, Egypt

7,000-year-old seaworthy vessels in Kuwait

7,500-year-old boat found in China’s Zhejiang Province.

Scientific Evidence for Pre-Columbian Transoceanic Voyages (273 pages-for the hardcore only!):

The only plausible explanation for these findings is that a considerable number of transoceanic voyages in both directions across both major oceans were completed between the 7th millennium BC and the European age of discovery. Our growing knowledge of early maritime technology and its accomplishments gives us confidence that vessels and nautical skills capable of these long-distance travels were developed by the times indicated. These voyages put a new complexion on the extensive Old World/New World cultural parallels that have long been controversial.

Neat!

(via ididntwanttosaymagicdoor)

Reblogged from descartesthinksnot

descartesthinksnot:

HELLO

The petition to legally recognize non-binary genders expired because it did not reach 100,000 signatures in time.

HERE IS A NEW PETITION. It expires April 20th. DO NOT LET THIS ONE FAIL AS WELL.

I don’t know how this is not already recognized. #SIGNAL BOOST

(via sebhar)

Reblogged from shuhannazy